skeet clay pigeon shooting

What’s the difference between Skeet and Trap Clay Shooting?

11 Nov 2019

There’s a lot of confusion between skeet and trap clay pigeon shooting, for anyone who hasn’t had a shooting session before.
This is understandable as they are both incredibly similar. Both shotgun games were developed to mimic bird hunting and have since turned into contests that are designed to test the marksmanship of the world’s best shooters. Both games have even made it into the Olympics!
In the latest blog from East Midlands Clay Sports, we are going to share the differences between skeet and trap clay shooting.

Understanding Trap Shooting

We will start with trap shooting; with the big difference in target presentations and the number of machines throwing the clay targets.
There are a number of different disciplines, with singles requiring shooters to stand 16 yards from the trap house. For larger competitions, shooters are placed into groups of five, called ‘Squads’. On each trap shooting course, there are five different shooting positions with each giving the shooter a different look at the clay targets as they leave the thrower. Shooters get five shots per position with twenty-five shots equal to one round.

‘Double Trap’ was introduced in 1911, with two targets thrown from the trap machine at the same time. The variable in this game is that the machine moves back and forth, meaning you won’t know what angle it will be coming from until it’s in the air.

Handicap is one of the most popular trap games with shooters assigned different shooting distances based on their skill level to even the playing field.
Trap is a straight-forward game with its origins dating back to the late 1700s and was originally developed to practice for hunting and even used live birds. Luckily times have changed.

How Skeet is Different to Trap Shooting

Skeet is quite similar to trap, but the targets move from side to side instead of away from the shooter, with skeet competitions consisting of ‘squads’ of five shooters.
Skeet shooting mixes things up with a round of 25 targets with eight of those targets are shot as doubles. This type of shooting made its Olympics debut in 1968, with American Kim Rhode becoming a legend for skeet and trap shooting, racking up medals at the last six summer Olympics plus six national titles.

Want to Give Clay Shooting a Try? Get in Touch

If you are considering trying clay pigeon shooting for the first time, get in touch today to book your first lesson with one of our instructors.
We also offer gift vouchers for shooters of all experiences, plus they can be used for birthday, stag and hen parties plus corporate away days.